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Wine, etc.: Like red, fruity wine? Here are some to discover.

Capital Gazette logo

Tom Marquardt and Patrick Darr

Capital Gazette, Patrick Darr and Tom Marquardt

"Far be it from us to tell you what you should like in wine. We may be able to tell you what is a good wine, but we can’t determine what is a good wine to you.

We can tell you, for instance, many cheap, jammy and sweet wines are not good wines. But, if you like them, who are we to say you shouldn’t?

So, call us frustrated that these extracted wines are flooding the market and attracting consumers who haven’t the desire to ponder something more balanced. While serious winemakers have been refining their wines for centuries, others have come along to mask defects with a load of sugar.

We get it. There are no rules, right?

“Once you ripen wine to almost a raisin quality, you lose a little varietal character, especially with cabernet sauvignon,” said Jay Turnipseed winemaker at the Rutherford Wine Co.

He said an over-extracted cabernet loses its red currant flavors, picks up more dark cherry and plum character and sheds some the tannins that give it ageability.

He doesn't take issue with producers who make these riper wines if it's appropriate for their business. While some winemakers base their reputation on complex and age-worthy cabernet sauvignon, others look for fast sales from ripe, sweet zinfandel blends.

If you like your red wine fruity and forward, here are some to discover:"

Among the six "Wine Picks" they feature our 2016 Mt. Beautiful Pinot Noir!

"Mt. Beautiful Pinot Noir North Canterbury 2016 ($30). This is another notable pinot noir from New Zealand where their pinot noirs are deservedly becoming better known. Deep dark and rich black cherry flavors are dominant in this bold pinot noir. It would do well with beef dishes."

Capital Gazette logo

Tom Marquardt and Patrick Darr

Capital Gazette, Patrick Darr and Tom Marquardt

"Far be it from us to tell you what you should like in wine. We may be able to tell you what is a good wine, but we can’t determine what is a good wine to you.

We can tell you, for instance, many cheap, jammy and sweet wines are not good wines. But, if you like them, who are we to say you shouldn’t?

So, call us frustrated that these extracted wines are flooding the market and attracting consumers who haven’t the desire to ponder something more balanced. While serious winemakers have been refining their wines for centuries, others have come along to mask defects with a load of sugar.

We get it. There are no rules, right?

“Once you ripen wine to almost a raisin quality, you lose a little varietal character, especially with cabernet sauvignon,” said Jay Turnipseed winemaker at the Rutherford Wine Co.

He said an over-extracted cabernet loses its red currant flavors, picks up more dark cherry and plum character and sheds some the tannins that give it ageability.

He doesn't take issue with producers who make these riper wines if it's appropriate for their business. While some winemakers base their reputation on complex and age-worthy cabernet sauvignon, others look for fast sales from ripe, sweet zinfandel blends.

If you like your red wine fruity and forward, here are some to discover:"

Among the six "Wine Picks" they feature our 2016 Mt. Beautiful Pinot Noir!

"Mt. Beautiful Pinot Noir North Canterbury 2016 ($30). This is another notable pinot noir from New Zealand where their pinot noirs are deservedly becoming better known. Deep dark and rich black cherry flavors are dominant in this bold pinot noir. It would do well with beef dishes."

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